Food

Anything someone might eat

Cooking with an Ostrich Egg

You have probably heard of Turducken where you stuff a turkey with a duck and then the duck with a chicken. Have you heard of an Ostriturkducken? That is the request my daughter asked me to do for this year’s Thanksgiving dinner. My response: No way! An ostrich is about 300 pounds. I don’t have a pan big enough! Actually I don’t have a stove big enough! Fortunately, a compromise was reached before I had to get out the shovel to dig a cooking pit. She settled with an ostrich egg for now.

Ostrich Egg

Ostrich Egg

Apparently  an ostrich egg can be purchased online (what can’t you buy online these days?) and have it shipped to your door. It was packed in disposable diapers which is a clever idea. If the egg cracked in shipping, the diapers would absorb any mess.

The Ostrich Egg Arrived Padded With Disposable Diapers

The Ostrich Egg Arrived Padded With Disposable Diapers

So now we have an egg; a very large egg.  Bigger than a softball but smaller than a football. A big white egg that felt like porcelain. We all took turns holding and touching it. We were mesmerized.

Bacon & Ostrich Egg

Bacon & Ostrich Egg

Then it dawned on us: how do we open it??? We’ve used a hammer on a coconut. Nutcrackers on lobster claws. My son-in-law produced a hammer and large spike from his toolbox. Driving the spike  through the egg at opposite ends exposed the yolk and egg white inside.

She Looks a Bit Uncertain About Opening the Ostrich Egg

She Looks a Bit Uncertain About Opening the Ostrich Egg

My older daughter recommended that we blow the liquid inside out of the shell. Do you know how long it takes to do that from an ostrich egg? Enough to wear out two adults and a child. Its more tiring than blowing up 50 balloons.

Blowing the Yolk & Egg Whites out of the Ostrich Egg

Blowing the Yolk & Egg Whites out of the Ostrich Egg

We collected the yolk and egg white into a bowl and whipped them up to make scrambled eggs. Or is that scrambled egg? It was good and tasted very much like  a chicken egg. You might be wondering  how many  people one ostrich egg feeds? That would be about  six normal people or  four really hungry ones. The only disappointing thing was the person who wanted the ostrich egg the most didn’t want anything to do with eating the scrambled egg. She said it was because she didn’t like the runny liquid coming out of the shell when we blew into it.

Scrambled Ostrich Egg

Scrambled Ostrich Egg

Now we just have to decide what to do with the shell. Does anyone have a dremel tool I can borrow?

Photos Courtesy of Sarah Vigue & Rebecca Dow. Thank you, ladies!

Yellow Potato Skins

This is not a recipe for baked yellow potato skins covered in sour cream, cheese, vegetables and bacon. This is about a personal discovery I had in my garden.

Some of my Potato Harvest

Some of my Potato Harvest

Maine is a potato growing state therefore we take our potatoes a little more seriously. I prefer the yellow potatoes. They have the same brown skins of most potatoes but inside they are a yellowish gold. Imagine a potato that once cooked and mashed, looks like you already added butter.

Rough Skinned Potato (Left) Smooth Skinned Potato (Right)

Rough Skinned Potato (Left)
Smooth Skinned Potato (Right)

I chose to plant yellow potatoes in my garden this year. This morning I harvested the earthy gems. As I washed off the soil, I noticed some had smooth skins while others had rough. Why? If there were all the same, why was there a difference in the skin texture. Was this one of those female and male plant things? I didn’t think so because the potato is the “fruit” of the plant. Perhaps it was because some were planted at one end of the garden and the rest at the opposite end? No, I don’t think the soil would be that different in a short distance apart.

Rough Skinned Potato

Rough Skinned Potato

Smooth Skin

Smooth Skin

So what was the answer? A little research uncovered the fact that in my area there are two types of yellow potatoes. Yukon Gold and Katahdin.

Yukon Gold

Yukon Gold

The Yukon Gold, an all-purpose potato has a  golden interior with rough brown skin. These are great mashed, boiled, in salads, fried and the best for soups and chowders. Yukon gold potatoes are the result of crossbreeding a North American white potato with a wild South American yellow-fleshed variety. These originated in Canada and made its way to the U.S. in the early 1980s.

Katahdin Potatoes

Katahdin Potatoes

The Katahdin is also an all-purpose potato. This is a smooth skinned potato with tan skin and yellowish flesh. These are ones I knew and thought I had planted. Katahdin potatoes are your French fry potatoes. They have that classic potato flavor. They’re fluffy, creamy, smooth and soft, and best for boiling, baking and, most importantly, making French fries. They’re not great for potato salads, gratins potatoes or any dish that requires the potatoes to hold their shape.

Obviously, I  had planted two different types of yellow potatoes. You are never too old to learn something new. Now I know a little more about yellow potato skins.

Glazed Zucchini Lemon Cake

Glazed Zucchini Lemon Cake

Glazed Zucchini Lemon Cake

Glazed Zucchini Lemon Cake
Recipe Type: Cakes
Author: Victrocious
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 1 loaf
When you have too many Zucchini make this delicious Glazed Zucchini Lemon Cake.
Ingredients
  • FOR CAKE:
  • 2 cups cake flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 1/3 cups sugar
  • 2 Tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 cup of grated zucchini
  • FOR GLAZE:
  • 1 cup confectioner’s sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 Tablespoon milk
Instructions
  1. In a small mixing bowl add the cake flour, salt and baking powder. Mix well.
  2. In a large mixing bowl add the eggs, oil and sugar. Beat until creamed well.
  3. Add to the sugar mixture, the lemon juice, buttermilk and zest of one lemon. Mix well.
  4. Fold the zucchini into the liquid mixture.
  5. Add the dry flour mixture to the wet mixture and mix well, scraping the bottom and the sides of the bowl.
  6. Pour into a greased 9″x5″ loaf pan and bake for 40 – 45 minutes in a preheated 350 degree oven.
  7. Check when done by inserting a clean knife into the center. If it comes out clean then it is done baking. If it comes out with batter still on the knife, bake it another 10 minutes. Repeat knife test until done.
  8. While the cake is baking you can get the glaze ready. Add the conf. sugar to a medium bowl. Slowly add the lemon juice and mix well. Add the milk and mix well. The consistency should be like a thick syrup.
  9. When the cake is baked and cooling, remove it from the pan. Now pour or spoon the glaze on the cake allowing it to run down the sides.
  10. allow the cake to cool and the glaze to set up before cutting & serving. Enjoy!
Notes
Tips:[br]1. How to make CAKE FLOUR if you only have all-purpose flour. Measure out the needed amount of flour into a small bowl. Remove 2 Tablespoons of flour from the bowl and put back into flour container. Add 2 Tablespoons of corn starch to the flour in the bowl and sift well until fully combined. [br]2. How to make BUTTERMILK if you only have regular cow’s milk. Measure out the needed amount of milk in measuring cup. Add 1 Tablespoon of vinegar (white or cider) to the measured milk. Let this sit for 1 minute to caudle. Now you can add this buttermilk to your recipe.

001

The Incredible Edible Pheasant Egg

I was recently given some pheasant eggs to try. What’s the difference between a chicken egg and a pheasant’s?

(L to R) 2 pheasant eggs, 1 white large chicken egg, 1 brown jumbo chicken egg

(L to R) 2 pheasant eggs, 1 white large chicken egg, 1 brown jumbo chicken egg

The difference between a chicken and a pheasant egg is mainly size, color of the shell and a lot less egg white. A chicken egg shell can be white, various shades of brown, tan, blue or olive green, and the inside of the shell is white or beige. The pheasant egg is deep olive green on the outside and a light robin’s egg blue on the inside of the shell.

(L to R) Brown chicken egg, 2 pheasant eggs, 1 white chicken egg

(L to R) Brown chicken egg, 2 pheasant eggs, 1 white chicken egg

They cook the same, although because of less egg white you would have to use a 2:1 ratio of 2 pheasant eggs to 1 chicken egg in your baking recipes. The pheasant eggs taste the same as a chicken’s. Many people believe that a duck egg is much richer than a chicken’s.

In this photo I have cracked both of the pheasant eggs and one large white chicken egg. You can see that the pheasant egg’s yolk is as large as a medium chicken’s egg.

(L to R) Large Chicken egg from a white shell and 2 pheasant eggs

(L to R) Large Chicken egg from a white shell and 2 pheasant eggs

Now I have added a jumbo brown chicken egg into the bowl for size comparison.

(L to R) Brown Jumbo Chicken egg, 2 pheasant eggs and Bottom White Large chicken egg

(L to R) Brown Jumbo Chicken egg, 2 pheasant eggs and Bottom White Large chicken egg

I scrambled the eggs, added seasonings and fried them together. Along with some bacon and toast, it was a delicious breakfast. Do not be afraid to try new things.