Tag Archive: Maine

Debsconeag Ice Cave

A hike that leads to an underground cave with ice coated walls in Maine? In August? My daughter, sister & I  were intrigued.

The Debsconeag Ice Cave is a difficult hike through a forest trail strewn with large boulders. My daughter didn’t find it difficult. I on the other hand am not in shape and climbing over  logs and boulders was difficult for me. Fortunately, the hike to the ice cave is only 3 miles round trip.

Trail to the Ice Cave

Trail to the Ice Cave

Notice the Size of the Boulders

Notice the Size of the Boulders

My Daughter didn't find the hike as difficult as I did

My Daughter didn’t find the hike as difficult as I did

The trail is clearly marked. Follow the blue blazes until you reach the signpost directing the cave is down a steep descent on the left.

Follow the Blue Blazes

Follow the Blue Blazes

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At the entrance to the ice cave switch on your flashlight and climb down  the rungs. Depending on the time of the year you may need a sweatshirt inside. At it was August, we certainly did not bring any sweatshirts to wear over our t-shirts. Truthfully, we were a bit disappointed with the amount of ice in the cave. We expected more. Perhaps we should have gone in Spring or early Summer.

Rungs Leading Down in the Cave

Rungs Leading Down in the Cave

Descent into the Cave

Descent into the Cave

Using flashlights are a must. Notice the cool mist rising as wall as patches of ice

Using flashlights are a must. Notice the cool mist rising as wall as patches of ice

Overall, it was a fun hike on a gorgeous day and we did enjoy our adventure to the ice cave.

Trees & moss growing on the boulders

Trees & moss growing on the boulders

It was a fun day!

It was a fun day!

Photos and Models Courtesy of Cilla Daugherty, Sarah Vigue & Vicki Page

Shin Pond Falls

Shin Pond Falls August 2015

Shin Pond Falls
August 2015

Photos Courtesy by Cilla Daugherty

There may not be a better time to go for a hike in Maine than in Autumn. North of Bangor Maine’s best foliage is the end of September to mid-October when the trees are multi-colored crimson, gold and orange. Walking through the colorful trees, brisk air and the destination of cascading falls is what you can expect from Shin Pond Falls.

Shin Pond Falls Directions

Shin Pond Falls Directions

A few neighbors and friends had suggested that a visit to the falls was well worth the hike. My daughter, sister & I  decided it was time to find these and see for ourselves. Turning off I-95 at exit 264, we followed Rte 11 for 11 miles to just above the town of Patten. A left turn onto Rte 159 North towards Baxter State Park (don’t worry, you don’t enter the park so no park fees.) and 4.5 miles later, we arrived at Shin Pond Village. Over the bridge and up the hill, turn left onto Shin Brook Road. Drive to the end, 1/4 miles and park. The mountain you can see from this parking area is Sugarloaf.

Cascades at Shin Pond Falls

Cascades at Shin Pond Falls

The trailhead starts here at the parking area. Stay left  on the trail until you get to the stream. There are two trails to choose: upper falls (if you take the left fork) or the lower falls (if you take the right fork). The upper Shin Falls is truly exhilarating as you can stand on ledge outcroppings and watch thundering water spill down to the pools below. The footpath to the lower falls is a short hike but very steep. There are three levels of the falls that cascade down the rocks for a drop of 18 yards.

Shin Pond Upper Falls

Shin Pond
Upper Falls

Shin Pond Lower Falls

Shin Pond Lower Falls with Cilla Daugherty

 

The clear water and trees are beautiful anytime of the year, especially in peak “leaf peeping” season.

Brook Trout

The Brook Trout is a popular species caught by fly-fishing Maine's lakes and rivers.

The Brook Trout is a popular species caught by fly-fishing Maine’s lakes and rivers.

April to May after the snow melts and the temperatures begin to warm is the time. Its time to catch Brook Trout in Maine. As the temperatures warm, Brook Trout move into smaller brooks and streams in Maine. All winter anglers have tied their flies to get ready for the fishing season. The anglers have thought about streamers like the bucktail or bugger and dry flies that resembled various insects.

Fly fishing in Piscataquis River in Guilford, Maine

Fly fishing in Piscataquis River in Guilford, Maine

Maine is a fisherman’s dream, whether you’re a seasoned angler or picking up a rod for the very first time. Freshwater fishermen delight in the more than 6,000 lakes and countless ponds, rivers and streams hosting healthy fish populations.

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Wearing waders the fisherman braves the chilly waters in hopes of catching brook trout

I enjoy the pink flesh of Brook Trout baked, grilled and fried. Grab your rod and head for the water to catch your share of Brook Trout. Its a treat that you will relish.

Brook Trouts' beautiful coloring

Brook Trouts’ beautiful coloring

 

 

 

 

 

A Covered Bridge to the Past

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Low’s Bridge is an historic covered bridge located in just off State Route 15 south of Guilford Village, Maine. The bridge was originally built in 1830, rebuilt in 1843, 1857 and 1990. The bridge was destroyed twice by spring flooding once on April 1, 1987. A modern covered bridge, patterned after the original, was built on the original abutments in 1990. The bridge has a clear span of 120 feet over the Piscataquis River.

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Low’s Covered Bridge was named in honor of one of the area’s first settlers, Robert Low. Once a major link between Guilford and Sangerville, today the bridge which has been referred to as a covered “bridge to our past”, serves as part of the area’s snowmobile trails in the winter, ATV trails in summer and as year-round ambassador for the area.

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As one of only nine covered bridges left in Maine, Low’s Bridge is listed on The National Register of Historic Places, has had several local businesses named after it and has been inspiring passion in artists, daydreamers and visitors of every sort for over 150 years.

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Boiled Red Hotdogs

Photo Courtesy by beansmeats.com

Photo Courtesy by
beansmeats.com

My husband is definitely from Maine. He likes red skinless hotdogs  aka Red Snappers. I think its actually a New England thing. Anyhow he put a few in a saucepan to boil (I prefer my hotdogs grilled and without all that dye) and then decided to add a couple of eggs because he wanted some egg salad with his hotdogs. Guess what happened? When he emptied the pan, the boiled white eggshells had turned pink!

You can see the pink egg on the left.

You can see the pink egg on the left.