Tag Archive: recipe

Yellow Potato Skins

This is not a recipe for baked yellow potato skins covered in sour cream, cheese, vegetables and bacon. This is about a personal discovery I had in my garden.

Some of my Potato Harvest

Some of my Potato Harvest

Maine is a potato growing state therefore we take our potatoes a little more seriously. I prefer the yellow potatoes. They have the same brown skins of most potatoes but inside they are a yellowish gold. Imagine a potato that once cooked and mashed, looks like you already added butter.

Rough Skinned Potato (Left) Smooth Skinned Potato (Right)

Rough Skinned Potato (Left)
Smooth Skinned Potato (Right)

I chose to plant yellow potatoes in my garden this year. This morning I harvested the earthy gems. As I washed off the soil, I noticed some had smooth skins while others had rough. Why? If there were all the same, why was there a difference in the skin texture. Was this one of those female and male plant things? I didn’t think so because the potato is the “fruit” of the plant. Perhaps it was because some were planted at one end of the garden and the rest at the opposite end? No, I don’t think the soil would be that different in a short distance apart.

Rough Skinned Potato

Rough Skinned Potato

Smooth Skin

Smooth Skin

So what was the answer? A little research uncovered the fact that in my area there are two types of yellow potatoes. Yukon Gold and Katahdin.

Yukon Gold

Yukon Gold

The Yukon Gold, an all-purpose potato has a  golden interior with rough brown skin. These are great mashed, boiled, in salads, fried and the best for soups and chowders. Yukon gold potatoes are the result of crossbreeding a North American white potato with a wild South American yellow-fleshed variety. These originated in Canada and made its way to the U.S. in the early 1980s.

Katahdin Potatoes

Katahdin Potatoes

The Katahdin is also an all-purpose potato. This is a smooth skinned potato with tan skin and yellowish flesh. These are ones I knew and thought I had planted. Katahdin potatoes are your French fry potatoes. They have that classic potato flavor. They’re fluffy, creamy, smooth and soft, and best for boiling, baking and, most importantly, making French fries. They’re not great for potato salads, gratins potatoes or any dish that requires the potatoes to hold their shape.

Obviously, I  had planted two different types of yellow potatoes. You are never too old to learn something new. Now I know a little more about yellow potato skins.

3 Ingredient Turtle Pretzels

Finished Turtle Pretzels

Finished Turtle Pretzels

Here’s an easy and quick recipe for Turtle pretzels with only three ingredients:

Ingredients
1- 10 oz bag Mini pretzels

Mini Pretzels

Mini Pretzels

1- 8 ox package Rolos, unwrapped

Rolos

Rolos

1 small package pecan halves

Pecan Halves

Pecan Halves

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F
Put parchment paper on a baking sheet.
Lay pretzels down on the parchment paper.
Place a Rolo on each pretzel.

Ready to go into the oven

Ready to go into the oven

Bake for 3 – 5 minutes watching for them to soften but not melt.
Take out of oven and add 1 pecan half per pretzel.
Let cool completely.
Enjoy!

Fiddleheads in Pasta

Fresh  picked and washed Fiddleheads

Fresh picked and washed Fiddleheads

Fiddleheads, if you don’t know, are the unfurled fronds of a young ostrich fern. They are collected in the wild before the frond has opened and sold as a seasonal vegetable in stores and outdoor markets.  They are called fiddleheads because they resemble the curled end of the stringed instrument, such as a fiddle.  Although not as common a name where I grew up, fiddleheads can also be called a crozier after the curved staff used by shepherds and bishops. In Maine, fiddlehead season has begun and will last 3 weeks.  North American Indians were eating fiddleheads long before the arrival of the first Europeans. The Australian and New Zealand aborigines and the Japanese are very fond of fiddleheads. In Indonesia, young fiddlehead ferns are cooked in a rich coconut sauce spiced with chilies, galangal, lemongrass, turmeric leaves and other spices. Choose firm, bright-green, tightly-curled fiddleheads with their little brown shells still intact. Eat only the curled head and a small portion of the green stem. To prepare fiddleheads, wash thoroughly removing any mud and brown papery covering, changing the water several times.

Fiddleheads in Pasta Photo Courtesy of TheCulinaryChase.com

Fiddleheads in Pasta
Photo Courtesy of TheCulinaryChase.com

Fiddleheads in Pasta

Serves 4
recipe adapted from The Culinary Chase

2 cups fresh fiddleheads, cleaned
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon minced garlic
salt and pepper
1 lb. orecchiette pasta or shells
8 oz. soft goat cheese, crumbled
chopped fresh basil

(the original recipe called for 2 cups wild mushrooms)

In a steamer set over simmering water, steam fiddleheads 5 to 10 minutes, or until tender. Drain and plunge into ice water until cold. Drain.

Heat butter and oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add garlic and cook 1 minute. Increase heat to medium-high, add fiddleheads and cook 3 to 5 minutes. Season generously with salt and pepper.

Meanwhile, cook pasta in boiling salted water until tender. Drain and add to fiddlehead mixture, tossing well. Divide into four bowls and top with goat cheese and fresh basil.

Note: My childhood memories of eating fiddleheads were mainly boiled until tender then served with butter and a tablespoon of vinegar which I still enjoy but this recipe takes this humble green to a new level. Fiddleheads are very fragile and highly perishable. Wrapped in a paper towel and placed in a plastic bag, they will keep in the refrigerator for a day or two. I keep them in a bowl of cool water in the refrigerator after cleaning, but only for a day or two. It is important to note that fiddleheads can be toxic when raw and it is therefore important to properly cook them.

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Checkerboard Sweet Potatoes

Checkerboard Sweet Potatoes

Ready in 1 hour

9 Servings

Nutrition Per Serving: 343 calories; 11g fat (4g saturated fat); 5g protein; 59g carbs; 6g fiber; 191mg sodium

 

Checkerboard Sweet Potatoes
Recipe Type: Potatoes & Sweet Potatoes
Cuisine: Side Dish
Author: Victrocious
Ingredients
  • 3 pounds sweet potato; cut into 2inch chunks
  • 1/2 cup Whole milk
  • 4 Tablespoons Butter
  • 1 Can (8oz) Crushed pineapple; Drained
  • 1/4 Cup Brown sugar; Packed
  • 1 Teaspoon Pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/4 Teaspoon Salt
  • 20 marshmallows
  • 40 Pecan halves
Instructions
  1. I1. Cover sweet potatoes with cold water and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook 12 to 15 minutes or until knife-tender. Drain and return to pot. Mash potatoes with a potato mashed, then stir in milk, butter, pineapple, brown sugar, pumpkin pie spice, and salt.
  2. Transfer mixture to a 2 1/2 quart oval casserole dish; smooth out top. Starting at the top left, alternate one marshmallow with two pecan halves until the entire casserole is covered. Bake at 350 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes, or until marshmallows are browned and puffed.

 

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Homemade Dog Food: Turkey & Rice Casserole

Homemade Turkey Rice Casserole for dogs

Homemade Turkey Rice Casserole for dogs

Homemade Dog food is best for your dogs with ingredients that are safe for your pet to eat. Your dog will enjoy this homemade dog food turkey & rice casserole.

Homemade Dog Food: Turkey & Rice Casserole
Recipe Type: Turkey & Rice Casserole
Cuisine: Dog Food
Author: Victrocious
Serves: 10 cups
Ingredients
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 lbs ground turkey
  • 2 cups brown rice
  • 1 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1/2 (16 ounce) package of frozen broccoli, carrots and cauliflower combination
Instructions
  1. Place the water, ground turkey, rice, and rosemary into a large Dutch oven. Stir until the ground turkey is broken up and evenly distributed throughout the mixture; bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the frozen vegetables, and cook for an additional 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cool. Refrigerate until using.
  2. Note: One VERY important thing to remember here is dogs do not chew their food 100 times before swallowing, therefore, it is extremely important to ensure veggies have been ground fine to ensure nutrients can be absorbed by their bodies. When swallowed in whole form, nutrients are locked in and will not release. Also important to note many nutrients, minerals and vitamins come from different sources, therefore ensuring you alternate between ground and root vegetables, adding ground/powdered egg shells for calcium and different oils for the omega fatty acids is a must. Our dogs may look great now, but it is when they hit their older years we will see the affects of what we fed now. Also, soft foods will not promote healthy gums and teeth. Therefore, feeding RAW (and I stress RAW) meaty bones are also mandatory. Cooked bones splinter. Raw bones are what wolves and coyotes have been feeding from for thousands of years. Good luck! It is well worth the research and effort to know your dog is getting only the best.